Library Bonanza

Ready, Set, Program!

Fairy Good Tales: Little Red Riding Hood

Introduction: Why are nursery rhymes and fairy tales important?

  1. Nursery rhymes are strong in rhythm, rhyme, and repetition
  2. Learn the basic patterns of story patterns including plot, theme, and character
  3. Can teach lessons about actions and consequences
  4. Knowing the original tale builds a platform for understanding & appreciating fractured tales

Shake Your Sillies Out, clap your crazies, jump your jiggles, stretch your stretchies

Abra Cadabra
Abra Kazoom
Let Story Time magic
enter the room (pull out paper with fairytale)

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  1.  Little Red Riding Hood:Storytell the original
    • Review Questions: Was the wolf good or bad? What do we call someone that we don’t know?
    • Once Upon a Dragon safety rhyme
  2. Action Rhyme: Little Red Riding Hood Rhyme from nurseryrhymes4u.com
    Note: The kids loved this rhyme! Make sure to point to the parts of the body and make them big!

    (Sung to the tune of ‘London Bridge is Falling Down’)

    Granny, what big eyes you’ve got,
    Eyes you’ve got, eyes you’ve got,
    Granny, what big eyes you’ve got,
    They’re so funny.

    All the better to see you with,
    See you with, see you with,
    All the better to see you with,
    My sweet honey.

    Ears – hear

    Teeth – eat

    And end with a ROAR!

  3. Fractured Tale: Let’s Play in the Forest flannel
    Note: Always a crowd pleaser!
  4. Finger Play: “Little Bunny Foo Foo”
    Note: We sang about another misbehaving, naughty child:

    Little bunny foo foo hopping through the forest
    Scooping up the field mice and bopping them on the head
    Down came the good fairy and she said
    Little Bunny Foo Foo I don’t want to see you
    Scooping up the field mice and bopping them on the head
    I’ll give you three chances and if you don’t behave I’ll turn you into a goon!
    The next day…

  5. Fractured Tale: Red Riding Hood and the Sweet Little Wolf by Rachael Mortimer
    Note: I have been having a much younger audience attend Fairy Good Tales, so I wasn’t able to find to many fractured tales for the preschool age crowd. This was a great one, though!

Activities & Take Aways

  1. Decorate flowers to bring to grandma
  2. Wolf paper bag puppet
  3. Cutting practice from 123 Homeschool for Me –  Riding Hood Pack

Supplies

  • Brown paper bags
  • Crafty stuff: pom poms, feathers, beads
  • Foam flowers
  • Green pipe cleaners
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Fairy Good Tales: Three Billy Goats Gruff

A trip trappy hello to you! This next on Fairy Good Tales, I present those grass-chomping conquistadors: the Three Billy Goats Gruff.

Storytime!

  1. Three Billy Goats Gruff – Storytell the original
    -Review Questions: What does cranky mean? Why do you think the troll was cranky? What makes you cranky?
  2. Action Activity: Sizes—Remind children that there were three sized goats: a small one, a medium one, and a big one. Have an older volunteer stand up and ask children what is bigger than child, what is smaller. Write results on wipe board.
  3. Action Rhyme: Troll (Monster) Pokey

    You put your claws in,
    You take your claws out
    You put your claws in
    And you shake them all about!
    You do the wild rumpus
    And you turn yourself about!
    That’s what it’s all about!

    Horns

    Big feet

    Hairy self

  4. Fractured Tale: Three Triceratops Tuff by Stephen Shaskan
  5. Finger Play: Three Billy Goats Gruff (from Pennsylvania Center for the Book)
    Three little goats went walking (hold up 3 fingers)
    one lovely summer’s day.
    They crossed a bridge to get some grass (fingers walk up arm)
    but a troll got in their way!They tricked the troll and down he fell (dive arm)
    into the water wet.
    Now three little goats are getting fat (hold up 3 fingers)
    and the troll hasn’t come back yet! (shake head)
  6. Fractured Tale: The Three Cabritos by Eric Kimmel

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Activities!

  1. Build the setting
  2. Paper plate goat
  3. Playdough Monster/Troll
  4. Bridge maze
  5. My Troll

 

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Fairy Good Tales: Jack and the Beanstalk

Fee fi fo fum
I smell the blood of an Englishman
Be he alive or be he dead
I’ll grind his bones to make my bread

Anger issues, amirite? Well, our trusty Jack (who just can’t stay out of fairytales and rhymes) comes to reclaim his rightful things that were once his father’s. Jack and the Beanstalk is another great classic fairytale suitable for all ages. It has action, repetition, suspense, and a big, booming voice for the giant. All the kids be like this when I do it:

Scared-Cat-on-Stairs

Age range: 1-8 years old with family
Introduction

  1. Why are nursery rhymes and fairy tales important?

i.      Nursery rhymes are strong in rhythm, rhyme, and repetition

ii.      Learn the basic patterns of story patterns including plot, theme, and character

iii.      Can teach lessons about actions and consequences

iv.      Knowing the original tale builds a platform for understanding & appreciating fractured tales

Abra Cadabra
Abra Kazoom
Let Story Time magic enter the room (pull out paper with fairytale)

Jack and the Beanstalk-Storytell the original (2 minutes)

Action Rhyme: If You’re Jack and You Know It

If you’re Jack and you know it climb the beanstalk
If you’re Jack and you know it grab the hen (ba-kaw!)
If you’re Jack and you know it run away
If you’re Jack and you know it use your axe (chop chop!)
If you’re Jack and you know it take a rest

Fractured Tale: Jack and the Beanstalk by Nina Crews
**This was a perfect fractured tale to read-aloud. I skipped over some wordy parts but the photographs were uncluttered, big, and were crisp and easy to see by all the kids. The fractured tale had a fun ending where the giant and giantess were actually family of Jack’s neighbor and had been trapped under a spell after the giant’s greed got out of control.

JackandtheBeanstalk jackbeanstalk10-11

**I had the next two ready but the crowd was a little young so we skipped to the activities.

Action Song: Jack Climbed the Beanstalk by Russ Ayon (song?)

Fractured Tale: Jack & The Hungry Giant: Eat Right with My Plate by Loreen Leedy

Activities

  1. Create your own singing harp – threading activity
  2. Bean stalk with felt leaves ABC activity – For this one, I used felt leaves with puffy paint
  3. Jack and the Beanstalk picture

Supplies

  • Yarn
  • Felt leaves
  • Blue construction paper
  • Green construction paper
  • Green tissue paper
  • Beans
  • Cotton balls
  • Crayons

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Harp used for threading with yarn

Harp used for threading with yarn

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Fairy Good Tales: The Ugly Duckling

The mother duck waited and waited until finally the egg cracked and out popped a much larger chick with a black beak and gray feathers. The mother duck looked at the new duckling and thought: He is my child but he doesn’t look like any of the others.

No one wanted to play with the poor ugly duckling. He was large and clumsy and so different from his brothers and sisters. They pushed him, pecked him, and chased him around the farmyard. Even the duckling’s brothers and sisters were unkind to him. This went on day in and day out until the dispirited duckling felt he had no choice but to fly away.

The tale of the Ugly Duckling is a classic tale of bullying based on appearance, of a poor duckling excluded from his family and laughed at by his neighbors. There is an infinite number of anti-bullying lesson plans and activities out there. Because I don’t have as much time with the children as a teacher might, I chose a select few–but very powerful. This storytime is an all ages, drop-in Saturday storytime and I had ages between 2 & 7. The ladies over at Jbrary reminded me that exclusion can be a hard topic to discuss with such a younger age set, but with the right tools, and the right tale, it can be done!

P1010480

  1. Introduction
    1. Why are nursery rhymes and fairy tales important?
  2. Abra Cadabra, Abra Kazoom, Let Story Time magic enter the room (pull out paper with fairytale)
  3. The Ugly Duckling
    1. Beginning questions: What makes you different from your sister or brother? What makes you different from your friends?
  4. Storytell the original (2 minutes)
    1. Define bully. Why was the duckling bullied? Who did the ugly duckling find in the end?
  5. Tale with book: The Ugly Duckling by Rachel Isadora: I love this version. Rachel Isadora always has the most beautiful and rich artwork and the tale closely follows the original.
    1. Add trumpeter swan call as the swans are flying overhead
  1. Song with clappers: Five Little Ducks (waddle and clap)
  2. Book: It’s Okay to Be Different by Todd Parr
  3. Egg Experiment: We are the same on the inside
  1. Activities
    1. Paper plate swan
    2. Being a friend – double handprints: This was a super cute idea but I had a lot of shy kids that didn’t want to become immediate friends with someone they never met. Obviously, it would work better in a classroom setting, but I allowed parent and child and siblings to create one together.

Supplies

  • White & brown egg, bowl
  • Paper plates
  • White feathers
  • Orange construction paper
  • Multi-colored construction paper
  • Acrylic paint
  • Markers
  • Scissors
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Fairy Good Tales: Goldilocks & the Three Bears

 

There’s nothing worse than coming back from a nice stroll, letting your scalding hot porridge cool, than to find it all eaten up. We’ve all been there, amirite?

porridge

Those look like tears of porridge. She needs to calm down.

This new addition to Fairy Good Tales was a pretty fun one with a lot of opportunity for storytelling and activities. Before I start with the structure of this particular program, I did want to mention some tips for storytelling (from my fabulous storytelling teacher at grad school). In my last blog post on Fairy Good Tales, I said:

“Storytelling is kinda like the lazy person’s form of acting mixed with a healthy dose of improv. You don’t have to memorize all the lines, just get the jist of the storyline down, and some main phrases, and you good.” (Ugh, I just quoted myself. I swear that I am not a narcissist and this will probably be the only time I will ever be quoted. So cool.)

It’s a bit more than that, but, for the simpler tales, not by much. As librarians doing three programs a week, we may not have the time to go into great depth like professional storytellers do but we can follow some of their process. I follow three steps to prep:

  1. Read the fairytale (I love to use Sur La Lune) while writing down the story line by line (I learn by writing/typing, so copy/pasting would serve no purpose to me).
  2. Read the story again and create an outline of the most important parts with some key phrases you want to use (usually these are repetitious phrases like “You can’t catch me I’m the Gingerbread Man”)
  3. Identify the Most Important Thing (MIT) of the story. By identifying why the story exists, this can help add personality details and side notes to the story. For example, the MIT that drove my telling of Goldilocks is to avoid greediness and consider others before you use something. Before Goldilocks entered the house, I mentioned that she was a selfish girl and did not think of others before she took what she wanted. Sure, she may have some underlying psychological issues that drive her personality but sometimes simple is just better for a young audience.

So, the things you need to memorize are the structure and some key phrases that you want to include. If your new to storytelling or you don’t have enough time to prep, it is really helpful to do stories you remember hearing as a child. Thus, Fairy Good Tales was born.

I started with an intro to why nursery rhymes and fairy tales are so important. These include:

  1. Nursery rhymes are strong in rhythm, rhyme, and repetition
  2. Learn the basic patterns of story patterns including plot, theme, and character
  3. Can teach lessons about actions and consequences
  4. Knowing the original tale builds a platform for understanding & appreciating fractured tales

We now use a great chant to introduce the fairytale by pulling it’s name on a piece of paper out of a very cool looking box that was a personal purchase by a coworker who had to have it that also had an, ahem, alchoholic beverage inside. Here’s the rhyme that we chant several times:

Abra Cadabra
Abra Kazoom
Let Story Time magic enter the room

I then asked the audience “How do you get something you really really want?” We eventually got to saying that you ask with magic words “please” and “thank you.” I then told the story of Goldilocks & the Three Bears. At the end, I asked the kids “What did Goldilocks do that was so wrong? Do you think the Bears would have let her visit if she asked?” While I didn’t get felt cutouts in time, you can tell the story again and invite the audience to repeat the repetitious phrases after you.

Now for the fractured tales! There are oh so many but I chose Rubia & the Three Osos by Susan Middleton Elya. It was short and sweet an combined English and Spanish words very fluidly. Highly recommended! We then did a fun Goldilocks Rhyme from Let’s Play Music that worked really well with the repetition and the simple movements. I was going to read Goldilocks and the Three Dinosaurs by Mo Willems but the crowd was a little restless and I didn’t provide enough action rhymes to space apart the book time.

Then, the best part of all: we tried porridge! I bought some Quaker Oats from the store, boiled some water right before the program started, and everyone got a little cup of porridge to try at the end. We then raised our hands if we loved the porridge or hated the porridge. We counted the goldilocks out and compared the two numbers, determining what was a larger amount and what was a smaller amount and by how much.

P1010383

And activities! Hooray! I chose three activities that families could do at their own pace. These included

  1. Size the objects P1010388
  2. Hard/Soft baskets & Hot/Cold P1010384
  3. Finger bears

For the older kids, I also included this neat Sherriff’s report. No one used it but some took it home at least. Fun times were had by all and this program had a great turnout (about 35 kids & caregivers came). It was also a group of people that don’t normally come to the library so that was very cool to see.

Oh, and Happy Thanksgiving everyone. Be courteous to the retail staff you encounter and, dear Flying Spaghetti Monster, do not shop on Thanksgiving.

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